Dark Tower Review | Personal Computer News - Everygamegoing

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Dark Tower
By Melbourne House
Commodore 64

 
Published in Personal Computer News #104

DARK TOWER

Prince Harry has been turned into what looks like an egg on legs and is trapped in the 28 screens of the Dark Tower. To return to looking more like royalty and less like henfruit, Harry must poach jewels and take them to the guardian of the tower. Only then will he be permitted to enter the final chamber, crack the puzzle and so come out of his shell.

You might guess from the scenario that this was another platform and ladders game, and you'd be right. But despite the lack of originality, the game still manages to offer a fair measure of entertainment.

Players who rise to a challenge, especially when there's a prize at stake, should particularly like it. The first 500 to complete the final puzzle will receive a free Melbourne House game.

Each screen has at least one exist and shows part of the tower, the main constituents being ladders, walls and ropes. Then, of course, there's the inevitable nasties; in this game they come rather more surreal than your common or garden brute. Flying crosses and flashing whatsits are the order of the day in the first few rooms.

Some paths are overhung with downward pointing arrows. As Harry passes under them, they descend a notch making return along the same way impossible. Should Harry fall from a height, be punctured by an arrow or struck by a whirling whatchamacalit, he immediately scrambles into a blob of strawberry jam.

The game is somewhat reminiscent of the Hungry Horace series, probably because of the pint-sized hero. The jolly theme tune is both original and catchy - it stays in your mind long after you've finished playing.

Although there's nothing new or startling about Dark Tower, it does offer an enjoyable multi-screened challenge. Worth trying.

Bob Chappell